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DougRich
05-13-2018, 01:45 AM
I began reading comics at an early age. My first exposure to them was probably finding a stack of my father's 'Mad' comics - published in the early '50s, before it switched to a magazine format to get around the Comics Code Authority - in a closet. My great-grandfather would sometimes visit from Wisconsin, and when he left he'd leave the comics he'd been reading - Gold Key 'Phantom's and 'Tarzan's and once, a copy of 'Green Lantern' - for my sister and me.

I remember one day in 1963, when I was nine, my mother was shopping for clothes at a local strip mall, and I went down to buy some comics from that squeaky rotating rack in the grocery store. (No comic shops in those days.) Up till that time I'd read mostly Batman, Superman, the Justice League and the Legion of Super-Heroes, but that day a couple of comics featuring characters I'd never seen before caught my eye, and I read them while sitting in the car waiting for my mother to finish her shopping.

36

When I was fifteen or so I decided I'd "outgrown" comics and sold the three or four fruit boxes of them I'd collected - no comic boxes in those days, either - to a second-hand bookseller for a penny each, including most of the first hundred issues of 'The Amazing Spiderman'. I did keep a few, though, including those two #1's, and I still have them today.

One of the biggest differences between the comics in those days and today's titles - aside from the divide between a cover price of 12 cents and $3.99, of course - is that every issue was pretty much a stand-alone. You could pick up an issue of just about any book and get all the backstory you needed in the first couple of pages. There were no "story arcs" to speak of, and continuing a plot from one issue to the next was practically unknown. I remember walking back from the drug store, reading 'Justice League of America' #21 as I went, because I couldn't wait to get home to read it, and being amazed at the idea that I had to wait till the following month to find out how it ended.

37

I've always had a fondness for the "other company" superheroes, as opposed to Marvel-DC. Even as a kid in the mid-'60s, I enjoyed finding and collecting - as I still do - superhero comics put out by ACG, Dell, Harvey, Tower, Archie, Gold Key and Charlton. Archie even tried turning the Shadow into a costumed superhero at one point. I remember being home sick one day, and one of my parents brought me some comics to read in bed, one of which showed the Shadow in a garish costume and cape. Even my ten-year-old self thought, "What the...?"

38

Gamewell45
05-13-2018, 02:11 PM
I'm a big fan of the 60's era comix "The Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers" are among my favorites to read.


40

Green Lantern
05-18-2018, 10:30 PM
I couldn't begin to guess what my first comic was. I was reading at 4, and have very little memory of childhood.

Dr. Who
05-18-2018, 11:10 PM
I couldn't begin to guess what my first comic was. I was reading at 4, and have very little memory of childhood.
I was reading at 4 as well, but I didn't see a comic book until I was about 8. My parents wouldn't buy them for us. I had some children's books and then a library card when I was 7. I became a pretty ferocious reader.

Green Lantern
05-19-2018, 02:01 AM
I was reading at 4 as well, but I didn't see a comic book until I was about 8. My parents wouldn't buy them for us. I had some children's books and then a library card when I was 7. I became a pretty ferocious reader.

I actually had teachers say they couldn't get me to put books down in class.

Cornwall
05-19-2018, 09:35 AM
I began reading comics at an early age. My first exposure to them was probably finding a stack of my father's 'Mad' comics - published in the early '50s, before it switched to a magazine format to get around the Comics Code Authority - in a closet. My great-grandfather would sometimes visit from Wisconsin, and when he left he'd leave the comics he'd been reading - Gold Key 'Phantom's and 'Tarzan's and once, a copy of 'Green Lantern' - for my sister and me.

I remember one day in 1963, when I was nine, my mother was shopping for clothes at a local strip mall, and I went down to buy some comics from that squeaky rotating rack in the grocery store. (No comic shops in those days.) Up till that time I'd read mostly Batman, Superman, the Justice League and the Legion of Super-Heroes, but that day a couple of comics featuring characters I'd never seen before caught my eye, and I read them while sitting in the car waiting for my mother to finish her shopping.

36

When I was fifteen or so I decided I'd "outgrown" comics and sold the three or four fruit boxes of them I'd collected - no comic boxes in those days, either - to a second-hand bookseller for a penny each, including most of the first hundred issues of 'The Amazing Spiderman'. I did keep a few, though, including those two #1's, and I still have them today.

One of the biggest differences between the comics in those days and today's titles - aside from the divide between a cover price of 12 cents and $3.99, of course - is that every issue was pretty much a stand-alone. You could pick up an issue of just about any book and get all the backstory you needed in the first couple of pages. There were no "story arcs" to speak of, and continuing a plot from one issue to the next was practically unknown. I remember walking back from the drug store, reading 'Justice League of America' #21 as I went, because I couldn't wait to get home to read it, and being amazed at the idea that I had to wait till the following month to find out how it ended.

37

I've always had a fondness for the "other company" superheroes, as opposed to Marvel-DC. Even as a kid in the mid-'60s, I enjoyed finding and collecting - as I still do - superhero comics put out by ACG, Dell, Harvey, Tower, Archie, Gold Key and Charlton. Archie even tried turning the Shadow into a costumed superhero at one point. I remember being home sick one day, and one of my parents brought me some comics to read in bed, one of which showed the Shadow in a garish costume and cape. Even my ten-year-old self thought, "What the...?"

38

I used to have a pile of "Sad Sack" comics as a child; my folks wouldn't buy them for me, but I used to get paid .25 to mow the lawn and I'd spend it on comics and baseball cards. :)

Dr. Who
05-19-2018, 11:11 AM
I used to have a pile of "Sad Sack" comics as a child; my folks wouldn't buy them for me, but I used to get paid .25 to mow the lawn and I'd spend it on comics and baseball cards. :)
I wish I had been paid for chores, but alas we were neither paid for chores, nor did we receive an allowance, only specific money as required. I started earning babysitting money from neighbors starting at age 11, but used it to buy articles of clothing that my mother wouldn't buy for me.

Cornwall
05-19-2018, 11:16 AM
I wish I had been paid for chores, but alas we were neither paid for chores, nor did we receive an allowance, only specific money as required. I started earning babysitting money from neighbors starting at age 11, but used it to buy articles of clothing that my mother wouldn't buy for me.

To a ten year old, back then .25 seemed like a million dollars. And the lawn was close to an acre on a hill no less.

DougRich
05-19-2018, 12:38 PM
I used to have a pile of "Sad Sack" comics as a child; my folks wouldn't buy them for me, but I used to get paid .25 to mow the lawn and I'd spend it on comics and baseball cards. :)

I think my allowance in those days was a quarter a week, and I recall usually spending it immediately on a couple of comics. Baseball cards came in a package of ten with a stick of bubble gum and were a nickel a pack. I had a couple of shoeboxes full of baseball cards that I gave away to some younger neighbor kids at about the same age I thought I'd "outgrown" comics; now I see cards in the glass case at the card store that are priced in the triple digits that I remember having, darn it.

When I was 28, in 1982, I was in charge of a Navy barracks at a Naval Air Station near Memphis, and I was conducting a room inspection. I opened a dresser drawer and saw this:

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It got my attention and before long I was back into the hobby with a vengeance. I didn't get back into baseball card collecting till I was in my early forties.

Green Lantern
05-19-2018, 05:06 PM
Allowance? What's that?

I've restarted collecting so many times. When I came to Richmond, I had a 9.8 graded copy of Deadpool's first appearance. I paid $20 for it. A few weeks ago, it was averaging $800. I wish the mechanics hadn't taken it.

Dr. Who
05-19-2018, 08:13 PM
To a ten year old, back then .25 seemed like a million dollars. And the lawn was close to an acre on a hill no less.
My parents bought their first house when I was 10. My first memory is my mother handing me a pair of scissors to cut the grass in the back of the house.:rolleyes2:
They eventually bought a handmower, which never seemed sharp enough. IIRC they bought a gas mower when there were no kids left at home to mow the grass! They did a lot of things like that after the free labor moved out.