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Crepitus
07-26-2018, 10:18 AM
Hey guys, we got any gourmet cooks out here?

Lol, actually that's not what I'm looking for. I'm a single dad, and I don't get home until 5 or 6 in the evening most nights, and I'm in a rut dinner recipe wise. Let's trade our favorite quick dinners!

I'll start:

Super-easy fajitas!

1 pound of chicken or beef cut into strips

Fresh green, red, yellow pepper cut into strips

Red and white onions same

Tortillas of course.

Taco seasoning (I use Ortega in the bottle) you will need 2-3 if you use the single serve envelopes.

Put everything (except the tortillas) into one big skillet and cook over medium heat until meat is done through, add seasoning and required water to package directions. Heat through and serve with warm tortillas.

Dinner in less than 30 minutes. Not fancy but filling and the kids love it.

Your turn!

DougRich
07-26-2018, 11:15 AM
Mushroom-Cheese Chicken (aka Dad's Chicken)

Put boneless chicken breasts in a casserole dish

Splash with a little red wine vinegar

Add equal parts Campbell's cream of mushroom and cream of chicken soup

Dice and add bell peppers

In the oven, covered, at 350 degrees for one hour

Take it out, put some American cheese slices on top and re-cover, let sit for a few minutes so the cheese will melt over the top

Serve on rice, if desired

spunkloaf
07-26-2018, 06:25 PM
I usually cook by tongue. I make amazing spaghetti sauce and lasagna.

Dr. Who
07-26-2018, 07:31 PM
Bigos - Polish Hunter's stew. In the old old days this was a stew that was always on in the pot and just added to with whatever game was brought home. Needless to say, unless you are living in the woods and hunting daily, this would not be very practical.

The base of the stew is a good stock and very well-rinsed naturally fermented sauerkraut.

I fry about two medium chopped onions until they are translucent and then add about half a can of well-rinsed sauerkraut until it all browns a bit. I also separately brown about 1/2 to 3/4 of a pound of 1" cubed seasoned beef or veal and an equal proportion of smoked sausage (it really doesn't matter what kind of smoked sausage, but I would avoid any that are too salty). You can use Kolbassa/Kielbassa just as well. They all work, as long as they are chopped in similar sized pieces as the beef or veal. Combine in your favorite stewing pot and cover with stock. Simmer until the beef or veal is almost ready to eat and then add some quartered potatoes and a couple of carrots. You may have to add additional liquid. Cook until the potatoes and carrots are tender.

This is not a thick type of stew - it's a bit of a hybrid between a soup and a stew. You can serve in a bowl on its own or with mashed potatoes or eat it with a hearty rye bread.

Note: You need to rinse the sauerkraut until it is only mildly sour and squeeze it several times until it is pretty dry before you add it to the frying pan. It is best if you actually put it in a clean tea towel and wring it to remove the moisture.

DougRich
07-26-2018, 11:23 PM
Note: You need to rinse the sauerkraut until it is only mildly sour and squeeze it several times until it is pretty dry before you add it to the frying pan. It is best if you actually put it in a clean tea towel and wring it to remove the moisture.

And even BETTER if you just leave out the sauerkraut all together. Just sayin...

Dr. Who
07-27-2018, 12:23 AM
And even BETTER if you just leave out the sauerkraut all together. Just sayin...It's really tasty. It's not really sour or anything like that. That's why you have to use naturally fermented sauerkraut. It completely different than the pickled variety. It even looks different. The fermented stuff is very finely cut and really packed into cans or bottles. There is very little liquid surrounding it. You have to try it to know the difference. It's far less acidic than the "other kind". It imparts a flavor apart from the slight acidity (once it has been well rinsed and drained of moisture) that you would never get in sauerkraut that is packed in vinegar or even wine.

Dr. Who
07-27-2018, 12:28 AM
And even BETTER if you just leave out the sauerkraut all together. Just sayin...
And just to razz you a little - when I was growing up, putting cans of cream soup in anything and topping with American cheese was a "Kraft recipe". Strictly verboten in my family home. My father would have left the table and made a sandwich. LOL.

Crepitus
07-27-2018, 02:49 AM
And just to razz you a little - when I was growing up, putting cans of cream soup in anything and topping with American cheese was a "Kraft recipe". Strictly verboten in my family home. My father would have left the table and made a sandwich. LOL.

Sadly I do that kinda thing all the time. I'm time limited many days.

I do usually is cheddar cheese though.

DougRich
07-27-2018, 05:16 AM
And just to razz you a little - when I was growing up, putting cans of cream soup in anything and topping with American cheese was a "Kraft recipe". Strictly verboten in my family home. My father would have left the table and made a sandwich. LOL.

Afraid my culinary tastes are not very sophisticated or "civilized". For the first ten years or so of our marriage, the wife and I (and the kids) ate a lot of Hamburger Helper. I would probably still be fixing and eating it had she not decided we could do better.

Yeah, I was turned off in terms of sauerkraut very early in life. My father was raised in an Amish home, so I guess for him it was one of those comfort foods we all have; he would occasionally prevail upon my mother to fix it, and I was totally grossed out by the smell. I can't say for sure whether I ever actually attempted to eat any. Funny, but some of my favorite food items - liver, cauliflower, sardines - have a similar effect on some people. The wife and I have an understanding that I won't steam broccoli or cauliflower while she's in the house and she won't kill me in my sleep. :thumbsup:

Crepitus
07-27-2018, 11:29 AM
Ok, time for the next one!

Mexican style chicken skillet.

You will need:
chicken, diced or sliced, about a pound. Works with light or dark meat.

Medium onion, diced.

Chilli powder, garlic, paprika, or other spices to taste.

11/2 cups of salsa

2 cups cooked rice

1 cup shredded cheese (I use Mexican style Kraft)



Season chicken and onions, cook in large skillit until chicken is done and onions are carmelized. Add cooked rice and salsa, heat through. Top with cheese.

Can serve with sour cream, cilantro, extra cheese, picante, anything that looks good to you.

If you like it spicier add some hotsauce with the salsa.

Dinner in under 30 minutes!

Dr. Who
07-27-2018, 01:02 PM
Sadly I do that kinda thing all the time. I'm time limited many days.

I do usually is cheddar cheese though.
The good thing about hearty soups and stews is that you can make a rather large amount with not much more effort than making one meal's worth and freeze the remainder in meal-sized portions. It's actually a time saver. Plus, from a health perspective, they are generally better for you than some things that people resort to because they are in a hurry.

Dr. Who
07-27-2018, 01:20 PM
Tasty rice - this is a flavorful accompaniment to fish.

Saute one medium finely chopped onion with half of a finely chopped red bell pepper and about 10 finely sliced cremini mushrooms. Add one cup of uncooked rice and allow it to brown slightly, then add 2 cups of tomato juice or V-8. Cover until the rice is cooked.

Crepitus
07-27-2018, 07:12 PM
The good thing about hearty soups and stews is that you can make a rather large amount with not much more effort than making one meal's worth and freeze the remainder in meal-sized portions. It's actually a time saver. Plus, from a health perspective, they are generally better for you than some things that people resort to because they are in a hurry.

I have two teenage boys. We rarely if ever have leftovers.

Dr. Who
07-27-2018, 08:00 PM
I have two teenage boys. We rarely if ever have leftovers.
You need bigger pots!

Dr. Who
07-27-2018, 08:11 PM
Afraid my culinary tastes are not very sophisticated or "civilized". For the first ten years or so of our marriage, the wife and I (and the kids) ate a lot of Hamburger Helper. I would probably still be fixing and eating it had she not decided we could do better.

Yeah, I was turned off in terms of sauerkraut very early in life. My father was raised in an Amish home, so I guess for him it was one of those comfort foods we all have; he would occasionally prevail upon my mother to fix it, and I was totally grossed out by the smell. I can't say for sure whether I ever actually attempted to eat any. Funny, but some of my favorite food items - liver, cauliflower, sardines - have a similar effect on some people. The wife and I have an understanding that I won't steam broccoli or cauliflower while she's in the house and she won't kill me in my sleep. :thumbsup:
I also love liver and actually had to teach hubby to like it. Probably not cooking it into shoe leather helped, along with adding lots of onions. He's learned to eat a few things that he wouldn't eat before. I, on the other hand, have come to embrace fish, which I didn't really eat unless it was canned, smoked or pickled. Mum was generally a very good cook, but she only bought frozen fish, which she overcooked.

spunkloaf
07-27-2018, 08:22 PM
Chicken Bacon Broccoli

Open package of Lean Cuisine Chicken Bacon Broccoli
Cut film to vent
Microwave on high for 3 minutes
Stir chicken and cheese sauce
Microwave on high for 1 minute and 30 seconds
Let stand for 1 minute before eating
Eat, leaving the broccoli because it's gross
Throw away broccoli

Crepitus
07-27-2018, 08:24 PM
Chicken Bacon Broccoli

Open package of Lean Cuisine Chicken Bacon Broccoli
Cut film to vent
Microwave on high for 3 minutes
Stir chicken and cheese sauce
Microwave on high for 1 minute and 30 seconds
Let stand for 1 minute before eating
Eat, leaving the broccoli because it's gross
Throw away broccoli



Lol, thanks for the tip!

Dr. Who
07-28-2018, 10:18 AM
Chicken Bacon Broccoli

Open package of Lean Cuisine Chicken Bacon Broccoli
Cut film to vent
Microwave on high for 3 minutes
Stir chicken and cheese sauce
Microwave on high for 1 minute and 30 seconds
Let stand for 1 minute before eating
Eat, leaving the broccoli because it's gross
Throw away broccoli


LOL.:cheesy:

Gamewell45
07-28-2018, 01:20 PM
My recipe for New York Style Crap dinner.

One box of Kraft Macaroni

Bring water to a boil;

dump in the macaroni (make sure you don't dump in the cheese packet since you'll need it)

Add a small section of butter to the water

Add a pinch of salt;

Cook for approximately 8 minutes;

Drain the macaroni and rinse with hot water;

Empty the drained macaroni onto a large platter;

Add a liberal amount of ketchup and stir the whole mess;

tear open the cheese packet and sprinkle over the macaroni

Serve.

It's fast to make, filling and damned good.

Dr. Who
07-28-2018, 03:47 PM
My recipe for New York Style Crap dinner.

One box of Kraft Macaroni

Bring water to a boil;

dump in the macaroni (make sure you don't dump in the cheese packet since you'll need it)

Add a small section of butter to the water

Add a pinch of salt;

Cook for approximately 8 minutes;

Drain the macaroni and rinse with hot water;

Empty the drained macaroni onto a large platter;

Add a liberal amount of ketchup and stir the whole mess;

tear open the cheese packet and sprinkle over the macaroni

Serve.

It's fast to make, filling and damned good.
I would add extra cheese and stewed tomatoes. Hold the ketchup.

DougRich
07-28-2018, 05:05 PM
One of my favorite things to do with leftover turkey is to cut the white meat into strips about the same size as a French fry, then dip them in catsup just like you would fries. It just occurred to me that I could deep fry those suckers and I'll bet they'd be even better that way. What do you think?

Crepitus
07-28-2018, 05:38 PM
1 pak Velveeta shells and cheese.
1 pound hamburger.
I can Rotel .
Hotsauce to taste.
Top with shredded cheese.

Crepitus
07-28-2018, 05:39 PM
One of my favorite things to do with leftover turkey is to cut the white meat into strips about the same size as a French fry, then dip them in catsup just like you would fries. It just occurred to me that I could deep fry those suckers and I'll bet they'd be even better that way. What do you think?

Everything is better deep fried.

Dr. Who
07-28-2018, 07:27 PM
One of my favorite things to do with leftover turkey is to cut the white meat into strips about the same size as a French fry, then dip them in catsup just like you would fries. It just occurred to me that I could deep fry those suckers and I'll bet they'd be even better that way. What do you think?
Deep frying cooked turkey could easily result in something rather dry & chewy, especially since you are talking about fry sized pieces. Perhaps if you allowed the pieces to soak in the batter for a while before frying, it might mitigate the drying effect. :undecided20:

Dr. Who
07-28-2018, 07:34 PM
1 pak Velveeta shells and cheese.
1 pound hamburger.
I can Rotel .
Hotsauce to taste.
Top with shredded cheese.
I had to look up Velveeta shells and Rotel. However, I make that from scratch - hamburger mac and cheese with stewed tomatoes. Love it. I've never tried Velveeta shells with cheese. Does it taste like Velveeta cheese? I remember eating the cheese when I was a kid, but I'm not too fond of it now.

Crepitus
07-28-2018, 08:14 PM
I had to look up Velveeta shells and Rotel. However, I make that from scratch - hamburger mac and cheese with stewed tomatoes. Love it. I've never tried Velveeta shells with cheese. Does it taste like Velveeta cheese? I remember eating the cheese when I was a kid, but I'm not too fond of it now.

It just tastes like american cheese, little salty, little cheesey. The Rotel and the hotsauce are the strong flavors.

Gamewell45
07-28-2018, 08:14 PM
I would add extra cheese and stewed tomatoes. Hold the ketchup.

The ketchup has the vinegar taste which adds tang to it. Extra cheese might help if its the dry powdered type that comes with it.

Crepitus
07-28-2018, 08:32 PM
Deep frying cooked turkey could easily result in something rather dry & chewy, especially since you are talking about fry sized pieces. Perhaps if you allowed the pieces to soak in the batter for a while before frying, it might mitigate the drying effect. :undecided20:

Very hot oil, very quick fry. They should be fine.

Dr. Who
07-28-2018, 08:47 PM
The ketchup has the vinegar taste which adds tang to it. Extra cheese might help if its the dry powdered type that comes with it.
Extra-cheddar cheese slices also work quite well. They melt very quickly.