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View Full Version : Texas school shooter's family likely not liable under gun access law



Dr. Who
05-22-2018, 07:18 PM
Under Texas law, prosecutors can file a misdemeanor charge against a gun owner who failed to secure a weapon and a child under 17 gains access to a "readily dischargeable" firearm from that person's property. That law, however, may not apply in the case of the alleged Sante Fe shooter, Dimitrios Pagourtzis, who is 17.
By Ray Sanchez, CNN - Tue May 22, 2018

(CNN)The 17-year-old who allegedly shot and killed 10 people and wounded 13 others at a Texas high school used his father's legally owned shotgun and revolver during the rampage.


The Santa Fe school shooting Friday has prompted a lot of debate among state politicians about the causes of the violence, which they attribute to everything from violent video games to the many ways people can get in and out of schools.



"Be sure that your kids and grandkids or anyone who might have access to your home cannot get your guns," Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick told CNN, citing yet another reason for the bloodshed.



Texas already is one of 27 states -- along with the District of Columbia -- with child access prevention laws on the books. There are no such laws at the federal level. The age in which the laws apply varies from state to state, ranging from children under 14 to those under 18.
https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/22/us/texas-school-shooting-safe-storage-law/index.html



There is an old saying that "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure". The best way to prevent your guns being used without your knowledge or stolen is to keep them secured. No amount of platitudes are going to make you feel any better if your guns are used to kill someone whether it be a child, a group of students or the guy at the convenience store.

DougRich
05-23-2018, 12:08 AM
It's one thing to take measures to prevent your small child from accessing your firearms; it may be something as simple as locking your guns up and putting the key someplace that is out of their reach. However, when we're talking about a 17-year-old, there are not a lot of practical ways to prevent a "child" of that age from foiling any attempt to keep the guns out of their hands. And unless that young person's behavior warrants some extra precaution - like storing the guns somewhere outside the home all together - what parent would think it necessary?

My sister and I grew up in a home that had a gun cabinet that stored seven or eight rifles and a couple of shotguns, with several pistols in a drawer and lots of ammunition for everything, all locked with a key that everyone in the family knew was sitting on top of the cabinet. Neither of us ever considered playing with the guns, let alone going on a killing spree, a good idea. My mother kept a loaded .32 caliber revolver in the drawer of her nightstand. A friend of my father's gave me an old .32 revolver when I was about eight, assuring my mother that the firing pin was removed. (It wasn't.) I never thought once about loading and firing it. To listen to some folks, the odds were greatly in favor of my family experiencing some gun-related tragedy at some point because we kids, at least in theory, had "access" to our parent's guns. Why do you suppose we never did?

Dr. Who
05-23-2018, 06:58 PM
It's one thing to take measures to prevent your small child from accessing your firearms; it may be something as simple as locking your guns up and putting the key someplace that is out of their reach. However, when we're talking about a 17-year-old, there are not a lot of practical ways to prevent a "child" of that age from foiling any attempt to keep the guns out of their hands. And unless that young person's behavior warrants some extra precaution - like storing the guns somewhere outside the home all together - what parent would think it necessary?

My sister and I grew up in a home that had a gun cabinet that stored seven or eight rifles and a couple of shotguns, with several pistols in a drawer and lots of ammunition for everything, all locked with a key that everyone in the family knew was sitting on top of the cabinet. Neither of us ever considered playing with the guns, let alone going on a killing spree, a good idea. My mother kept a loaded .32 caliber revolver in the drawer of her nightstand. A friend of my father's gave me an old .32 revolver when I was about eight, assuring my mother that the firing pin was removed. (It wasn't.) I never thought once about loading and firing it. To listen to some folks, the odds were greatly in favor of my family experiencing some gun-related tragedy at some point because we kids, at least in theory, had "access" to our parent's guns. Why do you suppose we never did?
I'm afraid kids weren't as messed up back then. You didn't have teens rampage killing every other month as we do now. Parents let their kids go outside and play without supervision back then and you all ate dinner together every day and you weren't allowed to hide in your room or the basement constantly. There are a lot of things that are different now that are probably contributing to the problem.