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View Full Version : Koreas make nuclear pledge after historic summit



Dr. Who
04-28-2018, 12:12 AM
The announcement was made by the North's Kim Jong-un and Moon Jae-in of South Korea after talks at the border.


The two also agreed to push towards turning the armistice that ended the Korean War in 1953 into a peace treaty this year.

...the leaders agreed on in a joint statement were:

An end to "hostile activities" between the two nations


Changing the demilitarised zone (DMZ) that divides the country into a "peace zone" by ceasing propaganda broadcasts


An arms reduction in the region pending the easing of military tension


To push for four-way talks involving the US and China


Organising a reunion of families left divided by the war


Connecting and modernising railways and roads across the border


Further joint participation in sporting events, including this year's Asian Games


The commitment to denuclearisation does not explicitly refer to North Korea halting its nuclear activities but rather the aim of "a nuclear-free Korean peninsula

DougRich
05-03-2018, 06:06 PM
I've spent time in South Korea, albeit 40-45 years ago, and gotten to know the people to some degree. They are very open with their feelings - one of the reasons that the Japanese, who tend to be the exact opposite, look down on and dislike the Koreans so much - and they have a sense of humor about themselves. In many ways, their national character is similar to that of Americans.

Of course relatively few outsiders truly know that much about life in the North, but I think it's safe to say that after living inside the bubble of the Kim family's personality cult for almost 75 years, and experiencing human rights abuses like nothing in the modern world for most of that time, along with national catastrophes - like the 240,000 to 420,000 who starved to death in the late '90s - that we find hard to even imagine, the North's population is bound to be radically different, in terms of world view and character, from their cousins in the South.

How do two so different people interact? My concern is that the military and political powers in the North will never truly let them do so. In terms of personal freedom - although it might still be somewhat repressive by Western standards - and prosperity in the South is going to look like heaven on Earth to somebody who has lived under the Kims for their entire lives. How do you tell an entire population, "Yes, we've been telling you for decades that your country is the envy of the world, that outsiders have nothing but evil intentions, and that your beloved leader is a god. Just kidding."?

Dr. Who
05-03-2018, 06:34 PM
I've spent time in South Korea, albeit 40-45 years ago, and gotten to know the people to some degree. They are very open with their feelings - one of the reasons that the Japanese, who tend to be the exact opposite, look down on and dislike the Koreans so much - and they have a sense of humor about themselves. In many ways, their national character is similar to that of Americans.

Of course relatively few outsiders truly know that much about life in the North, but I think it's safe to say that after living inside the bubble of the Kim family's personality cult for almost 75 years, and experiencing human rights abuses like nothing in the modern world for most of that time, along with national catastrophes - like the 240,000 to 420,000 who starved to death in the late '90s - that we find hard to even imagine, the North's population is bound to be radically different, in terms of world view and character, from their cousins in the South.

How do two so different people interact? My concern is that the military and political powers in the North will never truly let them do so. In terms of personal freedom - although it might still be somewhat repressive by Western standards - and prosperity in the South is going to look like heaven on Earth to somebody who has lived under the Kims for their entire lives. How do you tell an entire population, "Yes, we've been telling you for decades that your country is the envy of the world, that outsiders have nothing but evil intentions, and that your beloved leader is a god. Just kidding."?

Perhaps an official end of the war will also the North and South to trade, which would undoubtedly help the people in the North.

Crepitus
05-03-2018, 07:14 PM
The announcement was made by the North's Kim Jong-un and Moon Jae-in of South Korea after talks at the border.


The two also agreed to push towards turning the armistice that ended the Korean War in 1953 into a peace treaty this year.

...the leaders agreed on in a joint statement were:

An end to "hostile activities" between the two nations


Changing the demilitarised zone (DMZ) that divides the country into a "peace zone" by ceasing propaganda broadcasts


An arms reduction in the region pending the easing of military tension


To push for four-way talks involving the US and China


Organising a reunion of families left divided by the war


Connecting and modernising railways and roads across the border


Further joint participation in sporting events, including this year's Asian Games


The commitment to denuclearisation does not explicitly refer to North Korea halting its nuclear activities but rather the aim of "a nuclear-free Korean peninsula

Gotta throw this out there: you guys need to take this with the proverbial grain of salt.

NK has a long history of making noise about this kinda thing and then propping it as soon as they've got what they want. Even the nuclear disarmament thing isn't new..


In August 1971, both North and South Korea agreed to hold talks through their respective Red Cross societies with the aim of reuniting the many Korean families separated following the division of Korea after the Korean War. After a series of secret meetings, both sides announced on 4 July 1972, an agreement to work toward peaceful reunification and an end to the hostile atmosphere prevailing on the peninsula. Dialogue was renewed on several fronts in September 1984, when South Korea accepted the North's offer to provide relief goods to victims of severe flooding in South Korea.

In a major initiative in July 1988, South Korean President Roh Tae Woo called for new efforts to promote North-South exchanges, family reunification, inter-Korean trade and contact in international forums. Roh followed up this initiative in a UN General Assembly speech in which South Korea offered to discuss security matters with the North for the first time. In September 1990, the first of eight prime minister-level meetings between officials of the DPRK and South Korea took place in Seoul, beginning an especially fruitful period of dialogue. The prime ministerial talks resulted in two major agreements: the Agreement on Reconciliation, Nonaggression, Exchanges, and Cooperation (the Basic Agreement) and the Declaration on the Denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula (the Joint Declaration). The Joint Declaration on denuclearization was initiated on 13 December 1991. It forbade both sides to test, manufacture, produce, receive, possess, store, deploy, or use nuclear weapons and forbade the possession of nuclear reprocessing and uranium enrichment facilities. On 30 January 1992, the DPRK also signed a nuclear safeguards agreement with the IAEA, as it had pledged to do in 1985 when acceding to the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. This safeguards agreement allowed IAEA inspections to begin in June 1992.


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foreign_relations_of_North_Korea

pragmatic
05-04-2018, 03:11 PM
The announcement was made by the North's Kim Jong-un and Moon Jae-in of South Korea after talks at the border.


The two also agreed to push towards turning the armistice that ended the Korean War in 1953 into a peace treaty this year.

...the leaders agreed on in a joint statement were:

An end to "hostile activities" between the two nations


Changing the demilitarised zone (DMZ) that divides the country into a "peace zone" by ceasing propaganda broadcasts


An arms reduction in the region pending the easing of military tension


To push for four-way talks involving the US and China


Organising a reunion of families left divided by the war


Connecting and modernising railways and roads across the border


Further joint participation in sporting events, including this year's Asian Games


The commitment to denuclearisation does not explicitly refer to North Korea halting its nuclear activities but rather the aim of "a nuclear-free Korean peninsula

Confess i have not really followed the details of these developments.

But have to be a bit cynical about Lil Kim agreeing to anything that is going to bring about a sizable reduction in his power. This is not going to be like the reunification of the Germany's.

Dr. Who
05-04-2018, 11:53 PM
Confess i have not really followed the details of these developments.

But have to be a bit cynical about Lil Kim agreeing to anything that is going to bring about a sizable reduction in his power. This is not going to be like the reunification of the Germany's.

I don't see reunification for a very long time but perhaps they could become trading partners.