User Tag List

Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Is There a Deep Split between French and English Canada?

  1. #1
    Administrator Gamewell45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    575
    Thanks Given
    265
    Thanked 359 Times in 276 Posts
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Is There a Deep Split between French and English Canada?

    Is there a deep split between our neighbors to the north and if so, is it something that should concern the United States or is it an issue between the French and Anglo's that will work itself out over time?

    I read an article recently about this and thought that I'd post a link for those of you who might be interested in reading it.


    Canada’s conscious and successful striving after unity should be borne in mind as we examine another great and permanent problem of the country: preserving and encouraging harmonious relations between French Canada and English Canada. In this connection “English” Canada means all the population, whether of British or other origin, that speaks English.

    Though it is focused in Quebec and Ontario, the problem is Dominion-wide. A considerable minority in Quebec, nearly 20 percent of the 3.3 million in that province, are English Canadians. French Canadians form considerable minorities in every other province except British Columbia. French is the native tongue of three out of every ten Canadians.

    Many Americans wonder why the French in Canada have not been assimilated—swallowed up in the English majority. But assimilation was out of the question. The French did not go to Canada to be Anglicized. They went there to live as French men under the French flag. The history of Canada as a French colony is almost as long as that of the United States as republic.



    https://www.historians.org/about-aha...english-canada
    When you cuss a farmer, don't talk with your mouth full

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Outside of Montreal
    Posts
    228
    Thanks Given
    0
    Thanked 129 Times in 109 Posts
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    French Canadians are extremely protective of their language. They were very supportive when President Charles de Gaulle attempted to replace what was then the world's dominant language, English, with French. Obviously, it failed but the fall out is still there.

    Any immigrant who applies for citizenship in Canada has to pass an oral language test of their choosing, either English or French and this is accepted by all the Provinces as a minimum but when it comes down to citizens, it's not so clearcut.

    Here in Quebec, I face that problem. I don't speak French in a predominate french speaking province although most people understand English, even if they don't speak it. However, some are adament and one owner of a condo in the building in which I live, although a perfect speaker in English, refuses to speak to me and instead communicates by email in French, leaving me to put it through a translator.

    So, there you have it, from a personal point of view.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Beevee For This Useful Post:

    Gamewell45 (06-16-2020)

  4. #3
    Administrator Gamewell45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    575
    Thanks Given
    265
    Thanked 359 Times in 276 Posts
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I was intrigued by your post so I did some googling and found that there has been a push in recent years for either complete independence or increased sovereignty for the Quebecers. They are truly concerned about the preservation of their culture and language and are nationalistic in character and they are truly afraid of being assimilated by the rest of Canada.

    Apparently there have been some attempts since the mid-1860's and onward to push for their independence although it appears that the movement didn't catch fire until the 1950's-1960's when European countries were in the process of granting independence to many of their colonies at the time.

    I think it'll be interesting to see what, if anything, happens over the next decade since the movement seems to be alive and well based on what I've read.

    I've only been to Canada once in my life and that was to visit the city of Toronto; it was a rather nice city with pleasant people. I would like to visit Montreal someday especially since it is not that far from where I live (upstate NY) as I hear it is a beautiful city as well.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quebec...ignty_movement

    https://www.britannica.com/place/Can...bec-separatism

    https://www.thomas.k12.ga.us/userfil...erpoint%20.pdf

    https://www.csmonitor.com/World/Amer...ngles-politics
    When you cuss a farmer, don't talk with your mouth full

  5. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Outside of Montreal
    Posts
    228
    Thanks Given
    0
    Thanked 129 Times in 109 Posts
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't believe an independent Quebec is on the cards.
    The Parti Quebecois which was the predominate party for independence was all but decimated in the last election.
    French Canadians have lost the will to fight for it after having had reduced support over a number of elections. It isn't even spoken about lately and I think it's now a dead duck.

    French Canadians do their own thing whether they are part of Canada or not. Just google the covid_19 figures and you will probably find that over 50% of cases and deaths are in this province and worst of all in Montreal.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Beevee For This Useful Post:

    Gamewell45 (06-17-2020)

  7. #5
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Posts
    28
    Thanks Given
    1
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The French in Quebec are called Quebecois and many english speaking canadians dont have much good to say about them.
    Ive know more than a few as they come to fla in the winter and theres a group of canadians french and english Veterans that meet in our VFW.

    I also played in a quake clan that had mostly quebecois and I found them to be as nice as anyone else

  8. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Outside of Montreal
    Posts
    228
    Thanks Given
    0
    Thanked 129 Times in 109 Posts
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    They might me nice to you but many of them who speak both languages refuse to speak in English to those of us who do not speak French.
    I am an immigrant from the UK. When I applied for Canadian nationality, one of the provisos was that I spoke one of the two languages sufficiently enough to hold a conversation. Being a natural speaker of English, I was at the nationalisation ceremony and got speaking to a lady who asked me where I emigrated from and we spoke for about five minutes after which she said I had passed the test, when I wasn't even aware I was taking it.
    This ceremony is sanctioned by both the Federal and Provincial governments, so, I am rather pissed off when a French Canadian considers I should be speaking to him in French, when even the Federal government does not require me to do so.

  9. #7
    Administrator Gamewell45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    575
    Thanks Given
    265
    Thanked 359 Times in 276 Posts
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Beevee View Post
    They might me nice to you but many of them who speak both languages refuse to speak in English to those of us who do not speak French.
    I am an immigrant from the UK. When I applied for Canadian nationality, one of the provisos was that I spoke one of the two languages sufficiently enough to hold a conversation. Being a natural speaker of English, I was at the nationalisation ceremony and got speaking to a lady who asked me where I emigrated from and we spoke for about five minutes after which she said I had passed the test, when I wasn't even aware I was taking it.
    This ceremony is sanctioned by both the Federal and Provincial governments, so, I am rather pissed off when a French Canadian considers I should be speaking to him in French, when even the Federal government does not require me to do so.
    I have heard there are some tensions between the English speaking Canadians and French speaking ones for whatever the reason. Being my state borders Canada (and part of Quebec) I would like to learn French as a second language although my friend from Paris tells me rather disdainfully that the French Canadians have butchered the language pretty badly it hurts his ears when he hears them speak it.
    When you cuss a farmer, don't talk with your mouth full

  10. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Outside of Montreal
    Posts
    228
    Thanks Given
    0
    Thanked 129 Times in 109 Posts
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Gamewell45 View Post
    I have heard there are some tensions between the English speaking Canadians and French speaking ones for whatever the reason. Being my state borders Canada (and part of Quebec) I would like to learn French as a second language although my friend from Paris tells me rather disdainfully that the French Canadians have butchered the language pretty badly it hurts his ears when he hears them speak it.
    Lol. As a Brit, I could say the same about Americans brutalising the English language.
    What's wrong with the word normality? Why change it to normalcy?
    Also 'what did you got' doesn't even make sense to me.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •