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View Full Version : Broadcasters Club - why closed?



Checkerboard Strangler
04-19-2019, 11:36 PM
Well I guess that thread didn't live very long.
I don't know if I qualify as a broadcaster still but I have an FCC First Class ticket and I used to be a news camera guy.

Gamewell45
04-22-2019, 12:51 AM
It's not closed; where did you get that idea from?

Gamewell45
04-22-2019, 12:53 AM
Well I guess that thread didn't live very long.
I don't know if I qualify as a broadcaster still but I have an FCC First Class ticket and I used to be a news camera guy.

Anyone who worked in the broadcast industry or who has an interest in it is more then welcome to participate in the sub forum. Just that it's a new sub forum here and we are hoping to attract people from the industry here. :)

Checkerboard Strangler
04-22-2019, 05:28 PM
A few days ago the screen said Thread Closed. Perhaps it was a software glitch.

Gamewell45
04-22-2019, 09:23 PM
A few days ago the screen said Thread Closed. Perhaps it was a software glitch.

Well either way, welcome to the Broadcasters sub-forum! I'm a retired broadcaster (Radio/Television Engineer) and figured it would be nice to see if we can attract some broadcasters here to talk about anything broadcast related.

Checkerboard Strangler
04-22-2019, 10:04 PM
Well either way, welcome to the Broadcasters sub-forum! I'm a retired broadcaster (Radio/Television Engineer) and figured it would be nice to see if we can attract some broadcasters here to talk about anything broadcast related.

I was a radio station engineer for a very brief period because it was a one man band outfit (deejay AND engineering) but discovered it was a route to sure starvation, thus I went back to school and became a film editor instead.
But I wound up doing tons of freelance stringer news camera work, so hopefully that qualifies me, maybe.

FCC First Class Radiotelephone Operator Permit P-1-16-37875 issued June 1979.

http://i68.tinypic.com/351yexf.jpg

Gamewell45
04-22-2019, 10:16 PM
I was a radio station engineer for a very brief period because it was a one man band outfit (deejay AND engineering) but discovered it was a route to sure starvation, thus I went back to school and became a film editor instead.
But I wound up doing tons of freelance stringer news camera work, so hopefully that qualifies me, maybe.

FCC First Class Radiotelephone Operator Permit P-1-16-37875 issued June 1979.

http://i68.tinypic.com/351yexf.jpg

LOL you are definitely qualified.

I worked in commercial radio for the first 8 years of my 36+ years in broadcasting as an engineer (Studio/field/transmitter). Of course this is back in the days when major market AM stations still had large staffs of engineers to handle transmitter and studio operations in addition to field ops as well. We were paid pretty well for what we did (God bless NABET) since we got union scale and the working conditions were excellent. Eventually was moved into television operations for the remainder of my working career there after the sale of the radio division where I spent it as a technical director and videotape operator. Only job I ever held out of college and for me it wasn't work since I loved what I was doing so I tell everyone that i've never worked a day in my life.

Was your freelance work with a camera video or actual film? When I got hired back in 1979 film was on its way out and video was king of the roost. Now digital based platform is what they use but I'm sure you already know that. :)

Gamewell45
04-23-2019, 09:19 AM
A few days ago the screen said Thread Closed. Perhaps it was a software glitch.

Now that I think about it, you were probably looking at the welcome thread which is closed. :)

Checkerboard Strangler
04-24-2019, 12:43 AM
LOL you are definitely qualified.

I worked in commercial radio for the first 8 years of my 36+ years in broadcasting as an engineer (Studio/field/transmitter). Of course this is back in the days when major market AM stations still had large staffs of engineers to handle transmitter and studio operations in addition to field ops as well. We were paid pretty well for what we did (God bless NABET) since we got union scale and the working conditions were excellent. Eventually was moved into television operations for the remainder of my working career there after the sale of the radio division where I spent it as a technical director and videotape operator. Only job I ever held out of college and for me it wasn't work since I loved what I was doing so I tell everyone that i've never worked a day in my life.

Was your freelance work with a camera video or actual film? When I got hired back in 1979 film was on its way out and video was king of the roost. Now digital based platform is what they use but I'm sure you already know that. :)

---I'll try to be brief:
They trained us heavily in story technique first, possibly because the industry was in flux already but they started us on Magnasync Moviola machines, which I hated, then moved us to FLATBED editors (Steenbeck, KEM) so ALL film at the beginning. I liked the KEM flatbeds!

Now mind you 2-inch QUAD was still king (but 1-inch Type C was up and coming) so for videotape editing we trained on 3/4 inch Umatic systems but we had a CMX setup and they were really just interested in teaching us how to run a CMX system, the choice of deck would be up to whoever we worked for of course, and the training was offline in methodology first, then later online.
For online they just had a single AMPEX VPR-6 and they tied the U-matics to it because it was a school and the point was to just train us to do an online auto-assemble and get the gist of it.

Film cameras were all Bolex H16 and Eclair NPR, but we barely shot anything and to be honest, they kept stressing the "Sunny 16" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunny_16_rule) rule more than anything else LOL.

The TV cameras we had at the school were Hitachi...ummmm clawing my brain...Hitachi F41??? I am not sure I remember except they were old tired crap but good enough for school purposes. We either hooked them up to the JVC switcher, the Panasonic "suitcase" switcher or a Sony VO-3800 Umatic portable for field production.

Annnnnnnnd of course the moment I got out of school everything was already changing so fast, you know the rest.
And it still is.

There's much more but I don't want to churn out a long boring wall of word salad text.
All I can say is, I sure loved the switch to digital cine.

Gamewell45
04-24-2019, 02:45 PM
---I'll try to be brief:
They trained us heavily in story technique first, possibly because the industry was in flux already but they started us on Magnasync Moviola machines, which I hated, then moved us to FLATBED editors (Steenbeck, KEM) so ALL film at the beginning. I liked the KEM flatbeds!

Now mind you 2-inch QUAD was still king (but 1-inch Type C was up and coming) so for videotape editing we trained on 3/4 inch Umatic systems but we had a CMX setup and they were really just interested in teaching us how to run a CMX system, the choice of deck would be up to whoever we worked for of course, and the training was offline in methodology first, then later online.
For online they just had a single AMPEX VPR-6 and they tied the U-matics to it because it was a school and the point was to just train us to do an online auto-assemble and get the gist of it.

Film cameras were all Bolex H16 and Eclair NPR, but we barely shot anything and to be honest, they kept stressing the "Sunny 16" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunny_16_rule) rule more than anything else LOL.

The TV cameras we had at the school were Hitachi...ummmm clawing my brain...Hitachi F41??? I am not sure I remember except they were old tired crap but good enough for school purposes. We either hooked them up to the JVC switcher, the Panasonic "suitcase" switcher or a Sony VO-3800 Umatic portable for field production.

Annnnnnnnd of course the moment I got out of school everything was already changing so fast, you know the rest.
And it still is.

There's much more but I don't want to churn out a long boring wall of word salad text.
All I can say is, I sure loved the switch to digital cine.

Upon my transfer to television operations, they sent myself and approximately 65 other radio engineers off to "dumb dumb" school to teach us everything about television they could. I didn't even own a tv in those days; lots of radios but no tv lol. We were in class from 8-12noon, lunch from 12noon to 1pm. From 1pm-4pm we were supposed to study; well I can say that most of our study periods were held in Hurley's Bar :) Anyhow my scores in school were high enough where they decided t have me perform Tech Director duties at the outset; then they cut 4 positions but since I had seniority they couldn't lay me off so off to videotape land I went and stayed until retirement beckoned.

Most of the equipment initially was 1inch Sony BVH 1000's; quads were on the way out and the latest fad was the Panasonic M-2's (which made great boat anchors btw) Commercials were still being fed up using RCA TCR-100's. Telecine was a thing of the past. When I retired we were a tapeless format; everything was digital platform based.

Checkerboard Strangler
04-25-2019, 03:36 AM
Along the way I finally became the proud owner of three Sony BVH-3100's with the vacuum threading option, which was finally perfected by Sony.
What dream machines they were.

I got trained on the AMPEX ACR-25's first, TCR-100's later. One night a cart got jammed in the ACR and I'm telling you, you do not want to hear a pissed off ACR when it's gotten it into its head that it IS GOING TO LOAD that jammed cart even if it has to destroy itself in the process.
That ungodly thing was NOT going to take "NO" for an answer - LOL. Let's just say that a friend of mine once remarked that there are noises one never forgets and my face hurts from laughter because that ACR trying to argue with a jammed cart is the one that sticks in my head..from all the way down the hall, too! :biglaugh: :MSM:

I still have an old AMPEX VPR-6 but I just don't have the mad money set aside to rehabilitate it so it's sitting in the garage.
If I had a ton of orphan Type C clients I'd definitely get her up and running again. I digitized all my own old Type C stuff eons ago, too.

103

Yes, that IS an old Type B reel up there on the supply side, wrong tape - - just for looks.

Gamewell45
04-25-2019, 12:51 PM
I've heard the Ampex Machines were pretty easy to operate and if maintained, worked like charm.

I collect radio gear since I operate a part 15 AM/FM station. Most all equipment is analogue but works very well; it's like going back to the early 1970's when you walk in. Below is a picture of our master control room taken about 4 years ago:


104

The audio console is an RCA BC-7A along with RCA AM Modulation Monitor (the model number escapes me). The other side of the glass is where the talent sits facing the engineer.